Islands
Islands
 
Antigua
The largest of the British Leeward Islands All the signs pointed towards Antigua. The largest of the British Leeward Islands had warm, steady winds, a complex coastline of safe harbours, and a protective, nearly unbroken wall of coral reef. It would make a perfect place to hide a fleet. And so in 1784 the legendary Admiral Horatio Nelson sailed to Antigua and established Great Britain’s most important Caribbean base. Little did he know that over 200 years later the same unique characteristics that attracted the Royal Navy would transform Antigua into one of the Caribbean’s most sought after destinations. more...
Barbados
Welcome to Barbados. An exotic world with a uniquely compelling heritage and a wealth of extraordinary natural wonders from coast to coast. The easternmost island in the Caribbean, it harbors no fast food conglomerates, no private resort beaches, no cookie-cutter retail chains. Because it’s an island that does things a little differently. An island that hasn’t been homogenized, super-sized and commercialized away from even being Caribbean anymore. Where green monkeys and flying fish mingle with laughter and innocence and sugar cane and breathtaking natural beauty. An island for people who have a burning desire to take a vacation — and never, ever give it back more...
British Virgin Islands
Welcome to the British Virgin Islands 60 reasons to visit the Caribbean Each of the 60 islands (with only about 16 being inhabited) that comprise the British Virgin Islands has something for everyone with secret bays, hidden coves, isolated beaches, white-tipped waves, swaying palms and a unique people. The BVI were first inhabited by the Ciboney Indians who arrived in stone age canoes from the Americas, followed by the Arawak Indians from South America who peacefully dominated the islands for many years until the arrival of the Carib Indians. These Carib Indians were a fierce and aggressive bunch, who worked their way north from South America about one hundred years before Christopher Columbus arrived. Columbus’s discovery of the BVI in 1493 brought about its colonization by the Spaniards who were followed by the French and finally the British. In those days of old the islands abounded with pirates and privateers who left behind a rich legacy of tales of treasures untold. The primary islands of the British Virgin Islands are Tortola, Virgin Gorda, Anegada and Jost Van Dyke. Tortola Tortola, is also known as "land of turtle doves," or Chocolate City. It is the Territory's main and largest island, with a population of over 14,000. Sage Mountain is the BVI's highest point with a National Park at 1,780 feet above sea level. Tortola's mountain peaks are covered with frangipani and sage on its southern coast, while its northern shores flaunt white sandy beaches, groves of succulent bananas and mangoes and groups of palm trees. Beef Island, the site of the BVI's main airport, is connected to Tortola by a bridge. Road Town, the capital of the BVI is located on the southern shore of Tortola. Virgin Gorda Virgin Gorda or "Fat Virgin,” refers to a protruding mountain seen by Columbus when he first encountered the island. It is second largest of the British Virgin Isles at ten miles long and two miles wide (8.5 square miles), and a population of about 2,500. Virgin Gorda is known for its yacht clubs, quiet coves, and safe anchorages for bareboats. Anegada Anegada is just a dot on the map lying 20 miles north of Virgin Gorda. It covers 15 square miles and rises 28 feet above sea level with a population of about 250. Over the years, more than 300 ships have been wrecked on the perilous coral reefs encompassing the islet, a misfortune which, in turn, has made Anegada a heaven on earth for divers. The wrecks and reefs themselves have been enhanced with colorful formations of the ordinary undersea flora and fauna. Jost Van Dyke Jost Van Dyke is a four-square mile island to the north of Tortola's West End with a population of 200. Once known as the reputed hideaway for a Dutch pirate of the same name, Jost Van Dyke still opens it arms for travelers looking for an isolated, rustic getaway with first-class hiking trails. more...
Panama
Whether you seek seclusion and tranquility or thrills and adventure, Los Establos is your home away from home, distinctive in every way. Situated 4000 feet above sea level and over 16 acres coffee farm in charming Boquete , Los Establos offers spacious suites, magnificent views and luxurious hotel amenities to suit even the most discerning traveler. Featured, is the spectacular panorama of Volcan Baru (Panama's only volcano) and the surrounding national park. more...
St Lucia
Welcome to St. Lucia The Caribbean’s small, lush, tropical gem. St. Lucia is the sort of island that travelers to the Caribbean dream about—a small, lush tropical gem that is still relatively unknown. In natural beauty, St. Lucia seems like an island plucked from the South Pacific and tucked into the Caribbean. Its dramatic twin coastal peaks, the Pitons, soar 2,000 feet above the sea, sheltering magnificent rain forests where wild orchids, giant ferns and birds of paradise flourish. St. Lucia has been inhabited since long before colonial times, and its cultural treasures are a fascinating combination of its rich past and traditions. The island's people have earned a well-deserved reputation for their warmth and charm, and St. Lucia itself is dotted with fortresses, small villages and open-air markets. There’s a rich array of exciting and exotic activities available on St. Lucia. The island’s steep coastlines and spectacular reefs offer unparalleled snorkeling and scuba diving. Not to be missed is St. Lucia’s Soufriere volcano, the world’s only drive-in volcanic crater. The rainforest preserves of St. Lucia’s mountainous interior offer some of the Caribbean’s finest hiking and bird watching. Of course, the island also possesses excellent facilities for golf, tennis and sailing. more...
St Vincent And The Grenadines
Welcome to The Grenadines Thirty-two unspoiled islands & cays This necklace of thirty-two islands and cays in the Eastern Caribbean is 1,600 miles from Miami, USA. What’s waiting for you here? Spectacular landscapes, beautiful white-sand beaches and mesmerizing turquoise blue waters. When you land here, you’ve found the Jewels of the Caribbean! St. Vincent A lush volcanic island, just 18 miles north to south and 11 miles wide, its windward coast is lined with cliffs and rocky shores pounded by the Atlantic ocean. The leeward coast has spectacular slopes and valleys running down to beaches lapped by the tranquil Caribbean Sea. The Capital, Kingstown, combines reminders of its colonial past with the bright and bustling life of a modern market town. The Grenadines Make your leisurely way from island to island using the scheduled ferry boat or travel by air, or let one of the local tour operators be your guide through the islands: Bequia 9 miles south of St Vincent and the largest of the Grenadines. It is an island oriented to the sea, retaining age-old traditions of boat building, whaling and fishing. Canouan Measuring 3 miles by 1 mile, Canouan claims some of the best beaches in the entire Caribbean - long ribbons of powder-white sands, wide shallows and coral. The island has an airstrip for light aircraft. Mayreau One of the smaller Grenadines and privately owned with few residents, it can be reached by boat from Union Island. Mustique A gem of an island measuring 3 miles by 1 mile with a landscape as genteel as its lifestyle — green hills roll into soft white sand beaches and turquoise waters. Privately owned, this Grenadine isle has long attracted the elite of the world, including British royalty. >Palm Island A private resort with a very casual ambiance — 24 beachfront stone cottages and other accomodations, open-air dining and all watersports off wide, spectacular white-sand beaches. The Tobago Cays Numerous islets south of Canouan, guarded by some of the most spectacular coral reefs in the world. You can sail, snorkel and beach comb in complete seclusion in this rare tropical paradise that can be reached only by yacht. A national marine park is being developed here. Union Island A 2,100-acre mountainous island fringed by superb beaches, Union Island is the stopping-off point for yachtsmen and visitors heading to some of the smaller Grenadines. more...
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